Digg dating

A 2012 study published in the suggested that negative communication is one of the key culprits of divorce.

Another 2010 study found – unsurprisingly – that couples who criticized and yelled at each other early in the marriage had higher divorce rates.

But what might someone from the 19th century think about this unique fusion of technology and romance?

In the late 1800s, German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche had a lot to say about love.

They suggested that as long as we don’t include the obsessiveness of the early phases of romantic love in our definition of it, then long-term romance may be possible.

Whatever the lucky number, the reality is that over one-third of marriages do not make it to a 25-year silver anniversary.

Arguing that society was heading toward nihilism From a Nietzschean perspective, the rise of dating apps like Tinder, Hinge and Grindr that encourage us to “swipe” or judge potential lovers in a nanosecond could be cited as examples of a society that has become obsessed with pleasure and instant gratification.

Nietzsche also said that instinctive judgments are misleading because they “pronounce their Yes and No before the understanding can speak.” Furthermore, to act impulsively is decadent and hedonistic, and these are “signposts to nihilism.”So does the rise of online dating in our culture signal an embrace of self-indulgence?

(Studies also show that users will misrepresent themselves on their online profiles.)So sure, there might be an initial physical spark.

But what about the things that ensure a long-term relationship, like trust, constructive communication and enjoying joint activities? Research about how long romance lasts tends to vary.

He fantasized about giving two lovers a special pair of glasses so that they could see how the other would look in 20 years' time.

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