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Edie’s two grown children, her grandchildren, and her daughter-in-law all rally around Edie, determined to get her well.Of course there is a sad futility to their noble determination.by Matthew Dicks This story introduces us to a parallel world inhabited by imaginary friends whose existence depends upon their “imaginer friends” believing in them.

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In her epilogue, Worth tells what happened to each of the main characters in the series, and sadly, most of them died by the time she had written it.

Sadly, too, Worth herself died shortly after being diagnosed with cancer only two years ago.

At the heart of the story is Edie, age 60ish, morbidly obese, and killing herself with food.

The story opens with a five-year old Edie, already big for her age, and her parents expressing their love for her with food.

I loved how the opening scene was presented: There is a young woman, very young, in fact just twenty-one, seated on the edge of a paisley-draped foam couch in the living room.

She crosses and uncrosses her long legs under the midcalf, serviceable gray wool skirt, far too heavy for such a warm night.The second book, tells more about the Workhouses of historical England, and the people who grew up in them and how their lives were impacted.In this final book, we bear witness to more incredible stories of birth, as well as a saga of tuberculosis which would often wipe out entire families, and back-alley abortions sought by desperate women who already had more children than they could feed, living in poverty.I have no idea how accurately it portrays a child “on the spectrum,” and I have no idea if the author has any personal connection to anyone with autism.I’m always wary of reading about Down syndrome, being the parent of a child with Down syndrome – wary of stereotypes and misconceptions, especially when reading things by anyone who doesn’t actually have a personal connection to Down syndrome. I couldn’t wait to dig into this second book once I discovered it, remembering how much I loved Worth’s first book, and expecting more wonderful birth stories, being the birth-story junkie that I am. Rather than focusing on her career as a midwife (which, as it turns out, was relatively short-lived; I was disappointed to learn that midwifery was not her “calling,” but rather something she tried her hand at for a few short years.Nobody seems to understand – they all just see him as heartless and selfish, the asshole who left Edie in her time of need.

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